Categories
On Work

An extremely good problem to have

I just ended my one-year expat assignment for my company. I’m back in the US, most likely for good — so long, massive weekend farmer’s markets and cheap healthcare; hello political malaise and smartphone convenience.

While I was in Berlin, my job was very specific to the European market and required a deep embedding into European office culture. A lot of the standard corporate tropes apply — abundant meetings, open office environment, good-and-bad stakeholders to manage — but knowing how to navigate the interpersonal relationships and cultural nuances of an office is best done by immersing oneself in that office. Doing the same job from remote is, in a 8,000+ person company, difficult to sustain.

So now I’m in transition. Still at the same company, but looking for something to take on next as I phase out of my current responsibilities.

This has led to a very interesting phenomenon: a whole lot of teams seem to want me. I have spent roughly 30% of my last week simply meeting new people and learning about other problem spaces going on within the company, to see if they are interesting and impactful for me to take on.

While in many parts of both the US and the larger world people are constantly finding themselves out of work, struggling to make end’s meet, I’m having no less than 6 unique jobs thrown at me (disclaimer: all at the same company) with a crazy amount of enthusiasm.

This is an extremely good problem to have, and something I have weird feelings about.

  • I don’t love saying “no” despite having to do this a lot in my job. This is that same problem, but at a meta-level to product management — for the roles I don’t take, it’s: “Sorry, I don’t find your problem interesting enough to take a full-time salaried position to go solve.”
  • I’ve underestimated how many interesting product management problems there are at a Big E-Commerce Company. It calls into question why I spent over 3 years in largely the same space — doing different things, in different markets (and spending a full year living in a different market). But could I have been even happier by looking for these opportunities earlier on? Why aren’t some departments more proactive about showcasing their problems & solutions to attract people?
  • How firm of a decision do I really _need_ to make? If I pick a role that I like on paper and end up disliking, how easy is it to recall these same opportunities I’m currently being presented with?
  • Consider the bargaining-chip aspects of my position. If so many people want me, can I make them fight for me? How much of _that_ am I willing to push for, as opposed to simply being happy in my next position?

I realize these are extremely first-world questions to be asking. I am in an amazing position. But decisions are hard. And while it’s probably all going to be fine regardless of which path I take, I desperately want it all to be fine.

Originally published at tonedeafcolorblind.com on August 26, 2018.

Categories
On Technology

Dear Medium, I have a product thought for you.

Dear Medium, I have a product thought for you.

Do you have the ability to track which articles I’ve read or not? I’m pretty sure you can, since the Stats page exists. If so, could you not show posts I’ve already read in “My Top Stories?” Maybe in a new section called “recently viewed” instead?

If I’ve already read an entire post, why would I want to read it again? Or is this purely for validation that I read a popular/trending post? With all the repetitive, fake-inspirational pop writing on this site, the last thing I want to do is continue seeing literally the exact same posts every day.

For example, I’ve seen this one now 3 days in a row within the first five posts on my feed:


(Chosen for dramatic effect.) I read this, and I even liked it enough to recommend it. Why am I still seeing it? I have to imagine there’s more writing on this site than the tiny bit I’m actually seeing — so maybe this is a tiny start.

Thanks for (maybe) listening!

Cheers,

Brandon Green

Product guy from north of Boston

Categories
On Work

The misanthropy in product management

When I started product managing, I quickly came across and fell in love with the Cranky Product Manager blog. It was everything that I had just started to experience as a new PM — the constant fight for attention in the roadmap, the terribly-defined feature requests, the working ridiculously late for reasons I couldn’t really justify for myself. That blog is no longer active, but the feelings are still alive in many of the PMs I talk to around Boston and NYC — and they haven’t really gone away for the most part.

In my five years managing products I’ve learned to separate my work frustrations from my personal life, not burn myself out and communicate better — yet I’m still at the mercy of external forces: stakeholders not being honest about their requirements, teams not communicating with each other, salespeople overpromising to clients, founders falling back to buzzwords, people being lazy.

And you’re ultimately accountable to deal with all that as the product owner.

This photo intentionally left blurry to signify my hand-shaking frustration.

With all the hyper-positive blogging out there about exciting new products, startups and giant companies doing great things (which I love, don’t get me wrong), it’s worth remembering that in many cases, Product Management is largely a tough, punishing, thankless job, and I’ve found that it’s a little more manageable when you reduce your trust in people just a little bit. This isn’t a bad thing, really — we’re reminded as product builders to test out others’ hypotheses, second-guess user feedback, question assumptions and your options are to blindly follow or question. Both of which lead to a frustrating and/or misanthropic end.

Don’t get me wrong — I love building and managing products, solving challenging problems, and creating awesome user experiences. But I have a little less faith in people as a result of that passion.

(That’s probably why so many PMs end up trying to build their own products instead of building for others. Maybe I should finally try that.)

Want to learn more about who I am and what I do? Go to my website or tweet at me and we’ll hang out.